The destruction of the indies and

Originally a Spanish settler, Las Casas was appalled at the treatment of the Indians by the rapacious Spaniards. He became a Dominican friar,… Early life and efforts at reform The son of a small merchant, Las Casas is believed to have gone to Granada as a soldier in and to have enrolled to study Latin in the academy at the cathedral in Sevilla Seville. As a reward for his participation in various expeditions, he was given an encomienda —a royal land grant including Indian inhabitants—and he soon began to evangelize that population, serving as doctrinero, or lay teacher of catechism. Perhaps the first person in America to receive holy ordershe was ordained a priest in either or

The destruction of the indies and

However, Las Casas found their attempts insufficient to protect the welfare of the Indians, and returned to Spain to appeal to the Spanish monarch in Inafter Las Casas first wrote the chronicle later known as A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies, during the hearings ordered by Charles I of Spain to resolve issues of forceful conversion and colonial exploitation of Indians, Las Casas presented the account before the members of the Council of the Indies as proof of atrocities committed upon Indians by colonial authorities.

He describes the extensive torture, murder, and mutilation of the Natives, referring to them as "innocent Sheep" who were "assaulted" by the Spanish colonizers. On the island of Hispaniola, the Spanish were herding people into a straw building and setting fire to it, burning the occupants alive.

De Las Casas' A Short Account, was a revised history of the conquest, in the way that he includes facts that would aid him in his argument. De Las Casas supported the overall Spanish colonial experiment in the Americas, while condemning the abuse of the indigenous people.

The destruction of the indies and

Reliability[ edit ] The purpose of A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies was to convince the King of Spain to take action on the mistreatment of the indigenous people of the Americas. De Las Casas has been accused by many scholars[ citation needed ] about making exaggerated claims in terms of the death toll and mistreatment of the indigenous people.

Today, it is known that Old World diseases and the lack of immunity caused a large number of indigenous deaths. The reason why De Las Casas did not mention the number of indigenous deaths caused by old world diseases is not a political one. During the s, people did not know what caused disease or how it spread.

The discovery of germs wasn't until the s, and their association with diseases was not even accepted by the medical profession until the s. It is important to look at A Short Account as an important observation of what was happening to the indigenous people at the hands of the Spanish conquistadors, instead of only looking at it as an example of rhetoric or propaganda.

Rhetorical strategy[ edit ] A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies is a book that is acclaimed by scholars for its rhetorical effect. De Las Casas juxtaposes the inhumane mistreatment of the Spanish conquistadors with the inherent goodness of the indigenous people in an exaggerated manner in his strategy of persuasion.

His text largely uses an emotionally persuasive argument instead of a logical argument in A Short Account in his effort to convince the King of Spain.

CASAS: A SHORT ACCOUNT OF THE DESTRUCTION OF THE INDIES

De Las Casas revised and re-edited this book in order to make his best argument in favor of the indigenous people.of the Destruction of the Indies, with Related Texts, ed. Franklin W. Knight, & tr.

Andrew Hurley (Hackett Publ. Co., ), pp. , Permission pending. De Bry engravings in de Bry’s edition of Destruction; digital images reproduced by permission of the John Carter Brown Library, Brown University. destruction of the indies. bartolomÉ de las casas. edited and translated by nigel griffin with an introduction by anthony pagden.

The destruction of the indies and

a short account of the destruction of the indies. bartolomÉ de las casas. edited and translated by nigel griffin with an introduction by anthony pagden. He wrote A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies in , a shocking catalogue of mass slaughter, torture and slavery, which showed that the evangelizing vision of Columbus had descended under later conquistadors into genocide/5(4).

A Brief Account of the Destruction of the by Bartolome de las Casas The Project Gutenberg EBook of A Brief Account of the Destruction of the Indies, by Bartolome de las Casas This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.

destruction of the indies.

A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies From on, he lived almost continually in the New World.
A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies by Bartolome de Las Casas | heartoftexashop.com A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies was written with the task of informing the King of Spain about the murder and gold hoarding that was occurring in the New World.
In the four hundred years since his death he has been given many roles to play:
A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies - Wikipedia The professed purpose of the Spanish conquistadors in the Caribbean and Central America had been

bartolomÉ de las casas. edited and translated by nigel griffin with an introduction by anthony pagden. a short account of the destruction of the indies. bartolomÉ de las casas. edited and translated by nigel griffin with an introduction by anthony pagden. Bartolomé de Las Casas, (born or , Sevilla?, Spain—died July , Madrid), early Spanish historian and Dominican missionary who was the first to expose the oppression of indigenous peoples by Europeans in the Americas and to call for the abolition of slavery there.

A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies - Bartolome Las Casas - Google Books