Visiting a hindu temple

Temples In Chennai Temples In Chennai The bustling metropolis of Chennai, like any other big cities of the world, is on a fast track of growth and expansion. In all the pandemonium that is associated with city life, the serene and divine places like temples provide a safe sanctuary to briefly get away from the chaos.

Visiting a hindu temple

What You Will See And What It Means They Visiting a hindu temple the diversity of Hinduism itself, varying architecturally by region, town, or village of India, by historical era and philosophical school of thought, or by a specific diaspora's inclinations.

How does one visit a Hindu temple?

Koneswaram Temple - Wikipedia

In a literal sense, it appears obvious. First, get yourself to one. Second, take off your shoes, and third, step in.

Visit, in the most fundamental sense of the word, accomplished. A visit anywhere, though, is so much more than just the physical action of stepping in and stepping out. Their significance varies from one individual to the next. A vacation to Spain or a business trip to Detroit sound vastly different, but both involve me, the individual, going through the motions of life in a given location and concocting a mental snapshot of the entire experience to pull out in the future.

A trip's purpose doesn't always have concrete shape and form. Because many might not have a tangible reason for visiting a Hindu temple including myself on many occasionsI instead decided to make this post a Lonely Planet Guide no affiliation to the Hindu Temple.

Visiting a hindu temple

Acting as a guide of sorts for the interested visitor is a more promising role than telling others how to visit any place. Naturally, every Hindu does not attend a temple.

Some schools of Hinduism even eschew temples and the rituals often affiliated with them. For those who do attend temples, especially for interested visitors: They reflect the diversity of Hinduism itself, varying architecturally by region, town, or village of India, by historical era and philosophical school of thought, or by a specific diaspora's spiritual inclinations.

However, as I perceive it, there are three "rules of thumb" -- certain features that a visitor has a high probability of seeing when stopping by any Hindu temple.

Visiting a hindu temple

Rule of Thumb 1: The Confluence of Polytheism and Monotheism First and foremost, architecturally, a temple features either one or several shrines containing murtis, images of Hindu deities, to whom the shrines are dedicated. Often, a single shrine might dominate the others, reflecting the temple's affiliation with a primary deity.

You may witness devotees circling the shrines as a symbol of respect or offering prayers in front of shrines.

Visiting a Hindu temple – Importance of touching each step of a Devalay

To me, a general recognition of unity in diversity presides at nearly every Hindu temple: Even as multiple shrines combine to form a single temple, several deities mirror the diversity of the indescribable Brahman, the ultimate consciousness underlying existence.

Rule of Thumb 2: The Confluence of Ritual and Devotion Murtis often reflect the bhakti, or devotional, school of Hinduism, in which age-old mythological stories of justice, compassion, and love honor a single deity, rendering him or her worthy of being placed on a pedestal within a temple.

Inside a temple, perhaps the most colorful process that a visitor might notice is the observance of rituals, or pujas, that represent offerings to the divine. Typically, such rituals symbolize the relationship between the Supreme and the individual, humanizing the Supreme and conversely implying the presence of Brahman in the individual's heart.

Rituals involve waking the deity up in the morning with Sanskrit chants, bathing the deity with milk, clarified butter, and water, dressing the deity, and, in the evening, putting the deity to sleep.

Rule of Thumb 3: The Confluence of Individual and Infinite Pilgrims attend a temple to receive darshan, meaning "sight" in Sanskrit: The image represents an aid for forging this connection mentally. See the priest circling the deity with a flame and then extending it to the temple-goers?

This is the arathi ceremony, which occurs multiple times a day at nearly all Hindu temples. Arathi represents the symbolic surrender of one's existence to the Supreme: As it circles the deity, the flame symbolizes the individual soul's lifelong journey.

Then, the priest extends the flame, one-by-one, to each individual in the crowd beside the shrine: If ever you plan to book a trip to your nearest Hindu temple, I hope that this brief guide gives you some food for thought. On a less symbolic level than my rules of thumb, they're great places to go for general people watching and good food -- many have scrumptious vegetarian cafeterias.

So, if you feel like wandering over to the nearest Hindu temple, here's to a happy and hopefully more informed visit.Here are the some of the major festivals for Main Festival of the year to be celebrated at the Mandir; The Indian calendar is based on mathematical calculations based on the movement of the Sun, the Moon and various planets.

By Deepa Padmanaban. The spiritual land of India is dotted with Hindu temples, from the ubiquitous street side ones to some of the biggest and beautiful ones in the world. Upoming Festivals Please click here for list of hindu festivals dates for all over the world.

Please monitor this area for upcoming festival dates in various countries. We use this area to post observance dates for hindu festivals in diffferent countries as hindu calendar published in india cannot be use globally due to various factors.

Read this essay on Hindu Temple Visit. Come browse our large digital warehouse of free sample essays. Get the knowledge you need in order to pass your classes and more.

Only at heartoftexashop.com". Visiting a Hindu Temple A Beginner's Guide. Be they luxurious palaces, rustic warehouses, simple halls or granite sanctuaries, Hindu temples are springing up all over the world, numbering in the hundreds of thousands.

How does one visit a Hindu temple? In a literal sense, it appears obvious.

Get Updates

First, get yourself to one. Second, take off your shoes, and third, step in. Visit, in the most fundamental sense of the word, accomplished.

A visit anywhere, though, is so much more than just the physical action of stepping in and stepping out.

Your First Visit to a Hindu Temple | Ambaa Choate